Forced labor and other rights abuses are widespread in Thailand’s fishing fleets despite government and industry commitments to comprehensive reforms.

The report Hidden Chains: Rights Abuses and Forced Labor in Thailand’s Fishing Industry, by Human Rights Watch, describes how migrant fishermen from neighboring countries in Southeast Asia are often trafficked into fishing work, prevented from changing employers, not paid on time and paid below the minimum wage. Migrant workers do not receive Thai labor law protections and do not have the right to form a labor union.

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Criminal Infiltration into Global Sports
VideosWebinarsEvents 25 March 2015

When: March 25, 2015 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

  The spotlight has been fixed on human trafficking and professional sports. The focus draws attention to a range of organized crimes capitalizing on global sporting events such as the World Cup or the Olympics — crimes such as illegal...

Labour Exploitation and the Construction Industry
VideosWebinarsEvents 01 December 2015

When: December 31, 2015 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

According to the International Labour Organization and other sources, labour exploitation currently makes up the largest percentage of those who are trafficked. Some of the world’s greatest landmarks and feats of agriculture have been built through exploited labour. Today, more...

Responses to the Global Trade in Illicit Organs
VideosWebinarsEvents 17 June 2015

When: June 17, 2015 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Transplant lists grow longer year on year, and the percentage of successful matches made is in the single digits in most countries. While the purchase of organs is illegal almost everywhere in the world, organs are still procured through the growing...

Tracking the traffickers: How can banks be used to stop human trafficking?
Good PracticesVideos 20 March 2018

Human trafficking is devastating for the victims but low-risk for the criminals, whose activities are largely hidden from view. To disrupt it, law enforcement is turning to some unlikely new partners—banks. ...Read More