Recruitment

In line with the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (the Trafficking in Persons Protocol)’s definition, behaviour of recruiters and recruitment agencies can constitute the crime of trafficking in persons if they recruit a person through fraud, deception, abduction, etc. for the purpose of exploitation. Recruitment agencies also could be part of complex organized criminal groups involved in human trafficking, knowing that the victims were going to be exploited.
  
Regardless of whether or not the actual exploitation takes place, recruitment through the use of means listed in the trafficking definition for the intended exploitation is sufficient to fulfill the elements of the definition of trafficking in persons. Sometimes recruiters and recruitment agencies may not be aware of the exploitative situations that the victims will eventually find themselves in, but may still engage in practices that make people particularly vulnerable to ending up in exploitative work. While such practices may fall outside the definition of trafficking in persons, they may still contribute to the vulnerability of people and a climate in which trafficking in persons can flourish.

Finally, as also agreed by the ILO, deceptive, coercive, or leveraged recruitment is one of the key elements in trafficking in persons.

2018 ICT Benchmark Findings Report
Publications
21 June 2018

This report found that while technology companies are working to bring the world closer together, they are failing to connect with workers in their own supply chains. Our ICT benchmark ranked the top 40 global ICT companies—with a combined market...

How Companies can deal with Labour Exploitation in the Agricultural Sector
Publications
20 April 2018

Abstract This short paper tends to shed light and reflect on the way forward for companies to address labour exploitation in their agricultural supply chain. For that, it will first refer to some of the cases reported in Spain and...

Responsible Recruitment: Remediating Worker – Paid Recruitment Fees
Publications
20 November 2017

A major cause of forced labour in global supply chains is the charging of recruitment fees to migrant workers. Some companies have sought to reimburse workers charged these fees, many face serious challenges in doing so. Reimbursing worker-paid fees is...

Strengthening Protections Against Trafficking in Persons in Federal and Corporate Supply Chains – Research on Risk in 43 Commodities Worldwide
Publications
08 October 2017

Introduction and Project Background More than twenty million men, women and children around the world are currently believed to be victims of human trafficking, a global criminal industry estimated to be worth $150.2 billion annually. As defined in the US...

Hiring, Human Trafficking & Modern-Day Slavery in the Global Economy
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08 October 2017

This report begins by offering key findings from recent Verité research on the intersection of brokers, migrant workers and slavery. This research was performed in a variety of sectors and locales across the globe, including: the migration of adults from...

Making Workers Pay. Recruitment of the Migrant Labor Force in the Gulf Construction Industry
Publications
06 October 2017

This report gives an insight into the link between corporate practices in the Arabian Gulf’s engineering and construction sector and the recruitment – in South Asian countries like India and Bangladesh – of many of the migrant workers who staff the industry’s projects.

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