This discussion paper aims to provide practitioners working with business, human rights and/ or sustainable development with an overview of the connections between human rights, responsible business conduct and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (2030 Agenda), the opportunities an integrated approach brings for the realisation of human rights and sustainable development and the possible implications of an integrated approach in practice.

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Responsible Business Conduct as a Cornerstone of the 2030 Agenda - A Look at the Implications DOWNLOAD

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