When:
March 22, 2018 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2018-03-22T15:00:00+01:00
2018-03-22T17:00:00+01:00

The extractive industry is highly vulnerable to human rights abuses and environmental crime, such as human trafficking along with the uncontrolled use of toxic substances and deforestation. The sourcing of goods from geographically remote locations and often convoluted supply chains can easily conceal horrific human rights violations upstream from downstream suppliers and ultimately consumers. For example, unfair recruitment may be the start of a chain of exploitation, where the workers are exposed to debt bondage and forced labour. In addition, sex trafficking is also linked to the extractives sectors which is usually a predominantly male workforce. In addition to causing permanent damage to humans, toxic substances also cause permanent damage to the environment. Illegal mines, for instance, continue to reap damage on vast stretches of land with much less regulation and huge swaths of forest are cleared and burned. This clearing then leads to flooding, turning lush tropical rainforests into deserts and impacting flora and fauna. Compounding the challenge of identifying and combatting human trafficking and environmental crime is that many due diligence schemes lack concrete guidance for companies when determining the risks for extractive supply chains.

This webinar will tackle this complex web of challenges and vulnerabilities surrounding illicit activity and the extractive industry while offering promising anti-trafficking practices for the private sector.

Panelists:

Moderator: Carlos Busquets, Director of Public Policy, Responsible Business Alliance (former Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition)

Date: Thursday, March 22, 2018 at 10:00 am – 12:00 pm EST/ 3:00 – 5:00 pm CET


This webinar is co-hosted by the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized CrimeBabson College’s Initiative on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery and the International Organization for Migration (IOM), in collaboration with the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC) at George Mason University and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Center of Excellence in Criminal Network Analysis (CINA).

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